Sometimes, stories are like onions.

A year ago I posted a picture of my Easter egg about to hatch.

Unfortunately for my stretchmarks, I still had about a month to go. I don’t really have a point behind reposting this picture, except to remind you that Easter is coming!

Since Violet is almost three, this last year has been a beautiful rediscovery of our faith-based traditions and how to explain their meaning and origin to a two year-old. Easter is proving tougher than I first thought.

Here’s some questions I’ve had to answer:

What is “dead” like?

Where is Jesus’ body?

Why did they hurt him?

How did He come back to life?

Is my fish dead?

Sin?

Can Jesus fly?

I feel strongly about teaching my children about the life of Jesus from a young age, and this tends to jump starts conversations I don’t always wish to have. In order to tell her that Easter is the celebration of when Jesus rose from the dead, we have to talk about what “dead” means, how someone get’s dead, why they hurt Jesus, why He let them, and how His death saved us from ultimate death in our sins. Which brings us to another layer in the onion of storytelling–sin. Where is the Easy Button already?

In other news, I can pretty much guarantee that if Violet thinks something is funny, Henry will too. Tonight right before bed, she was snorting through her nose and running back and forth between Henry and the mirror on the wall. Henry was completely doubled over with laughter–hysterical, knee-slapping, belly laughter. Of course, there’s pretty much no way to record such cuteness because they will immediately stop doing anything video-worthy the second I hit record. I need to pretty much just bug my house with hidden cameras but I hear that is expensive.

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One thought on “Sometimes, stories are like onions.

  1. I love your egg belly picture. I also believe in teaching them about Jesus from a young age but, I won’t lie….it intimidates me. You should post sometime about how you explain these things to Violet.

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